Monday, October 29, 2007

Clyde Bellecourt--american indian

I am Clyde Howard Bellecourt and I was born May 8 1936. I am the seventh of tweleve children born to my loving mother and father Charles and Angeline. Born on the White Earth Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, one of the largest and poorest reservations, I grew up always learning about the indian reservation on an Ojibwe tribe. My Ojibwe name is Nee-gon-we-way-we-dun, this means "Thunder Before Storm". In grade school I always ws taught about our founding father of this country, George Washingon. I didn't know waht to think of this because i was sure he did not look like my father. But I still was accepting the learning of this. As I got older I was sent to prision for American offenses such as burglary and robbery. It was hard because my family was so poor. Whil in prision I was taught much about indian history such as stolen land and broken treaties with the Americans. I was upset by this discrimination my people were having and through this I was soon becoming very intersted in getting involved in my culture and was becoming very spirited. This is around the time when i started the American Indian Movement, otherwise known as the AIM. Oficially started in 1968 but I otherwise think it was '62 as I thought this up in prision at this time. I have since been very involved as an active leader in AIM. I have since than started alternative schools for Indian children, helped negotiate the 20 solution paper presented at the White House, and founded the Legal Rights Center. A big meeting I participated in for representing AIM was the first non-governmental organizations hearnings on discrimination of Indigeous people. I have also founded many organizations fo support the Indian tribes in America. I am very proud of what I have acomplished to stand up for my rights and culure in America and will keep moving foward to hold my culture strong

13 comments:

knelson said...

It seems like you are very accomplished and turned your life around for the better. I'm guessing you are against the use of the Sioux mascot since you are an active member of the AIM, which is very against discrimination and disrespect of Indians.

sarah said...

i am very much against the use of the Sioux masocot and find it to be disrespectful of the indian tribe. I think that they can find plenty of other names and mascots.

Breezy said...

I agree that UND can find plenty of other names for the team, yet at the time no one had any problems with the college having this name. Though it is becoming more of a problem to deal with race in this day in time. So in dealing with the situation at hand, I believe you are dealing with a lot in your job and it is very commendable that you are against the nickname of the 'Fighting Sioux'.

melissaPETERSON said...

You are very accomplished. I am sure many native american children look up to you. If they don't they should!

Rachel said...

Hey I'm the fifth jury member. What's your view on the mascot? Do you think UND should be able to keep it or should have to make a new one. Thanks!
- Amy Red Oak

caitlin said...

I'm very proud of you Clyde! You are very accomplished. I am very glad that you are against the Sioux mascot. I am glad you are on my side. LEt's be FRIENDS!

-Doris Strickland

melissaPETERSON said...

As you do I find the schools name and mascot to be offensive, and should potentially be changed.

Ellie said...

Yes, the University could easily change their name, but why would they want to? They have had the same name since the school was built. I do not think that fighting Sioux is in any way offensive to the Sioux tribe. It is if anything honoring the Native Americans.

caitlin said...

clydey- we should def get everyone on our side!!! our side is poppin'! love it!

NAlverson said...

Hey, this is Chief grand Cherokee, the jury member. I am just saying that it isn't really a big deal, it is just a picture, and they don't mean anything by it. Besides, the council has more important things to deal with than a college with a picture of us on it. By the way, it would be nice if you wouldn't comment back, I already have a ton of comments to reply to and I don't have time for this. Thank you.

kyle said...

Dear Clyde,
I respect that you are so respectful and dedicated to your culture. My guess is that you are against the North Dakota mascot and team name. Do you think you would be able to collaborate with some of the UND directors and share with them the true traditions and ethics of your tribe so that they can keep the mascot but have it be a lot more symbolic and positive rather than offensive and comical?

-Gunther Foy

Rachel said...

Hey Clyde

Thanks for responding back to me on your view of the UND mascot. When you say that you don’t support the mascot, I agree! My tribe is the Standing Rock Sioux, and we have historically lived in North Dakota. Since I was born and raised on our reservation, I share the same views as the tribe. We believe that the mascot is degrading and misinforming towards the Native American race. There are so many other mascots available to use and mascots involving Native Americans shouldn’t have to be used. Thanks for supporting the removal of the UND mascot!
- Amy Red Oak

Dezzi said...

I agree. There are so many other names and mascots that these people could come up with, without being disrespectful to other races. Just because they feel superior to us does not give them the right to degrade and humiliate us like this. They should be more empathetic towards other races and think about how other races would feel before they go and do something